TRIESENCE SIDE EFFECTS

  • Generic Name: triamcinolone acetonide injectable suspension
  • Brand Name: Triesence
  • Drug Class: Corticosteroids, Ophthalmic
Last updated on MDtodate: 10/12/2022

SIDE EFFECTS

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in practice.

Adverse event data were collected from 300 published articles containing data from controlled and uncontrolled clinical trials which evaluated over 14,000 eyes treated with different concentrations of triamcinolone acetonide.

The most common dose administered within these trials was triamcinolone acetonide 4 mg administered as primary or adjunctive therapy primarily as a single injection. The most common reported adverse events following administration of triamcinolone acetonide were elevated intraocular pressure and cataract progression. These events have been reported to occur in 20-60% of patients.

Less common reactions occurring in up to 2% include endophthalmitis (infectious and non-infectious), hypopyon, injection site reactions (described as blurring and transient discomfort), glaucoma, vitreous floaters, and detachment of retinal pigment epithelium, optic disc vascular disorder, eye inflammation, conjunctival hemorrhage and visual acuity reduced. Cases of exophthalmos have also been reported.

Common adverse reactions for systemically administered corticosteroids include fluid retention, alteration in glucose tolerance, elevation in blood pressure, behavioral and mood changes, increased appetite and weight gain.

Other reactions reported to have occurred with the administration of corticosteroids include:

Allergic Reactions: Anaphylactoid reaction, anaphylaxis, angioedema

Cardiovascular: Bradycardia, cardiac arrest, cardiac arrhythmias, cardiac enlargement, circulatory collapse, congestive heart failure, fat embolism, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in premature infants, myocardial rupture following recent myocardial infarction, pulmonary edema, syncope, tachycardia, thromboembolism, thrombophlebitis, vasculitis

Dermatologic: Acne, allergic dermatitis, cutaneous and subcutaneous atrophy, dry scalp, edema, facial erythema, hyper or hypo-pigmentation, impaired wound healing, increased sweating, petechiae and ecchymoses, rash, sterile abscess, striae, suppressed reactions to skin tests, thin fragile skin, thinning scalp hair, urticaria

Endocrine: Abnormal fat deposits, decreased carbohydrate tolerance, development of Cushingoid state, hirsutism, manifestations of latent diabetes mellitus and increased requirements for insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents in diabetics, menstrual irregularities, moon facies, secondary adrenocortical and pituitary unresponsiveness (particularly in times of stress, as in trauma, surgery or illness), suppression of growth in children

Fluid and Electrolyte Disturbances: Potassium loss, hypokalemic alkalosis, sodium retention

Gastrointestinal: Abdominal distention, elevation in serum liver enzymes levels (usually reversible upon discontinuation), hepatomegaly, hiccups, malaise, nausea, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer with possible perforation and hemorrhage, ulcerative esophagitis

Metabolic: Negative nitrogen balance due to protein catabolism

Musculoskeletal: Aseptic necrosis of femoral and humeral heads, charcot-like arthropathy, loss of muscle mass, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, pathologic fracture of long bones, steroid myopathy, tendon rupture, vertebral compression fractures

Neurological: Arachnoiditis, convulsions, depression, emotional instability, euphoria, headache, increased intracranial pressure with papilledema (pseudo-tumor cerebri) usually following discontinuation of treatment, insomnia, meningitis, neuritis, neuropathy, paraparesis/paraplegia, paresthesia, sensory disturbances, vertigo

Reproductive: Alteration in motility and number of spermatozoa.

 

SRC: NLM .