Nifedipine Dosage

Generic name: nifedipine
Class: Calcium channel blocking agents

What is Nifedipine

Nifedipine is a calcium channel blocker. The structural formula of nifedipine is a 3,5-pyridine dicarboxylic acid, 1,4-dihydro-2,6-dimethyl-4-(2-nitrophenyl)-dimethyl ester, C17H18N2O6nifedipine dosage

Nifedipine is a yellow crystalline molecule that is essentially water-insoluble but ethanol soluble. It has a 346.3 molecular weight.

Precautions and warnings

Nifedipine Dosage

This article is applicable to the following Nifedipine Dosage  of 10 mg, 20 mg 30 mg 60 mg 90 mg

Common Adult Dose used for:

Usual Adult Dose for Hypertension

Extended-release tablets:

Comments:
Doses can be gradually increased from between 7 and 14 days.
Some extended-release tablet makers advise a maximum dosage of 90 mg/day.

Comments:
This drug should be utilized in conjunction with a complete program to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease (e.g. cholesterol control diabetic management, antithrombotic treatment, smoking quit and exercise, and sodium intake restrictions).
The most significant benefit that was observed with the use of the drug is the decrease in stroke risk. However, there were also decreases in myocardial infarctions as well as mortality from cardiovascular causes.

Use: Treatment for hypertension to decrease the chance of death and nonfatal cardiovascular events particularly myocardial infarctions, strokes, and strokes.

Usual Adult Dose for Angina Pectoris Prophylaxis

Immediate-release capsules:

Extended-release tablets:

Comments:
Doses may be gradually increased every between 7 and 14 days.
Doses that are immediate-release and above 120 mg/day are rarely required.
Certain extended-release tablets manufacturers advise a maximum dosage of 90 mg/day.
Tests that last up to 8 weeks have demonstrated decreased angina frequency and a higher endurance to exercise; however, the safety and effectiveness beyond eight weeks are not known.

Uses:
Treatment of vasospastic gina is identified by the classic pattern of angina at rest, accompanied with ST-segment elevation and angina, or the coronary artery spasm caused by ergonovine OR angiographically documented coronary artery spasm
The clinical presentation suggests a vasospastic cause, but vasospasm hasn’t been proven (e.g. the pain is an undetermined threshold of the exertion, or when angina appears to be not responsive to nitrates, or to sufficient levels of beta-blockers)
-Management of chronic stable angina/effort-associated angina without evidence of vasospasm in patients who remain symptomatic despite adequate doses of beta blockers and/or organic nitrates or who cannot tolerate those agents

Usual Adult Dose for Angina Pectoris

Immediate-release capsules:

Extended-release tablets:

Comments:
Doses can be gradually increased every between 7 and 14 days.
Doses that are immediate-release and above 120 mg/day are typically not required.
Certain extended-release tablets manufacturers suggest a dosage of 90 mg per day.
Tests lasting up to eight weeks have revealed a decrease in angina frequency and a higher tolerance to exercise. However, the safety and effectiveness beyond eight weeks are not known.

Uses:
Management of vasospastic angina as demonstrated by the classical pattern of angina that is not accompanied with ST-segment elevation and angina, or coronary artery spasm caused by ergonovine OR angiographically-proven coronary artery spasm
The clinical presentation suggests a vasospastic component, however, vasospasm is not confirmed (e.g. pain is an undetermined threshold of the exercise or when angina is resistant to nitrates or sufficient dosages of beta-blockers)
-Management of chronic stable angina/effort-associated angina without evidence of vasospasm in patients who remain symptomatic despite adequate doses of beta-blockers and/or organic nitrates or who cannot tolerate those agents

Renal Dose Adjustments

The data is are not available

Liver Dose Adjustments

Capsules with immediate release Information not readily available

Extended-release tablets:

Dose Adjustments

Immediate-release capsules:
Rapid titration for patients who are under constant examination:
Day 1 10 mg orally, 3 times per day.
Day 2 20 mg orally three times per day.
Day 3 and beyond 30 mg taken orally 3 times per day.

Patients who are hospitalized under strict supervision Patients under close supervision: Increase dose in increments of 10 mg (maximum one dose of 30 mg) every 4 to 6 hours in order to manage arrhythmias and pain.

Extended-release tablets:
Moving from capsules that are immediate-release:
Switch to the closest equivalent daily dose (e.g. 30 mg taken orally three times per every day (in IR capsules] could be changed to 90 mg once per each day (in ER tablets[in ER tablets])

Refusal of treatment:
Doses should be reduced gradually and patients must be monitored for adverse reactions.

Dialysis

Information is are not available

Other Comments

Administration tips:

Storage needs:
Instant-release capsules: Protect them from moisture and light and avoid freezing.
Extended-release tablets protect against water and light.

General:
Patients can be taking sublingual nitroglycerin in conjunction with acute angina.
Prolonged/modified/extended-release formulations may not be bioequivalent to immediate-release formulations.

Monitoring:
Cardiovascular The heart rate, blood pressure, rate, and symptoms of angina, particularly during the time of initiation and titration

Patient advice:
Inform patients that this drug could cause dizziness, drowsiness blindness, lethargy nausea, or headache and that they should not drive or use machinery till effects of this drug are evident.
Inform patients to report any symptoms or signs of Stevens-Johnson syndrome, hepatitis/jaundice, hypersensitivity reactions.
Patients who are taking extended-release tablets are advised not to be worried if they discover tablets inside their stool.
Patients are advised to seek out a medical professional in the event of becoming pregnant, planning to be pregnant, or nursing.
Patients are advised to inform their doctor of any other medications, both prescription and nonprescription, or herbal supplements they take.

Additional details

Always consult your doctor to make sure the information presented on this site is appropriate to your specific situation.

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