Mitral Valve Stenosis

Mitral valve stenosisMitral valve stenosis, often referred to mitral stenosis is an obstruction in the mitral valve in the heart. The valve is not able to fully open, thereby preventing circulation of blood towards the heart’s pump chamber (left ventricle). Mitral valve stenosis could cause you to feel tired and short of breath, in addition to other symptoms.

The primary reason for mitral valve stenosis comes from a disease known as rheumatic disease that is linked to streptococcal infections. Rheumatic disease – which is becoming rare on the United States, but still prevalent in countries with poorer infrastructure may cause damage to Mitral valve. If not treated mitral valve stenosis could cause serious heart issues.

Symptoms

In mitral valve stenosis the pressure rises in the heart , especially in left upper chamber. It then is transferred to the lungs, creating fluid (congestion) and breathing problems.

The condition usually worsens as time passes. There are times when you feel better due to mitral valve stenosis, but you might experience mild symptoms for a long time. The symptoms of mitral valve stenosis generally are seen between 15 to 40, however it can happen at any age even during childhood.

The signs and symptoms of mitral valve narrowing are:

Mitral valve stenosis symptoms could manifest or become worsened whenever your heart rate is elevated or increases, for instance, during exercise. It is also possible that they are triggered due to pregnancy or other causes, like infections.

When should you seek medical help?

Make an appointment immediately if you feel tired or short of breath after exercise and heart rate. You may also experience chest discomfort.

If you’ve found yourself diagnosed as having mitral valve disease, but did not experience any symptoms, consult your physician when you should schedule a regular examination.

Causes

Mitral valve stenosis causes are:

The way that the heart functions:

heart physiologyThe heart, which is the central point in your system of circulation is composed of four chambers. The two chambers in the upper (atria) are filled with blood. Two lower chambers (ventricles) pump blood.

The heart valves of the four shut and open to ensure that blood flows only in one direction towards your heart. Mitral valve, which is located in between two heart chambers, on your left is composed of two parts called leaflets.

The mitral valve opens as blood flow from left atrium into the ventricle on left. The flaps then close to stop the blood from entering the left ventricle. A damaged heart valve is unable to completely close or open.

Risk factors

Mitral valve stenosis can be as rare as it ever was due to the most common reason, rheumatic fever is not rare within the United States. Rheumatic fever is an issue in countries that are developing.

Risks associated with mitral valve stenosis are strep infections that have not been treated and the presence of rheumatic disease.

Seniors are more at risk of developing Mitral Valve Stenosis. As you age calcium deposits may form around the mitral valve that can cause mitral valve stenosis.

Sometimes, patients who receive radiation therapy for certain kinds of cancer can suffer from mitral valve mitral valve stenosis.

Problems

As with other heart valve issues Mitral valve stenosis may restrict your heart and slow the flow of blood. If left untreated mitral valve stenosis could cause complications, such as:

Prevention

The most effective method to avoid mitral valve stenosis is to avoid the main cause of it, the rheumatic fever. It is possible to do this by making sure you and your children visit your doctor about an aching throat. A strep throat infection that isn’t treated can lead to the rheumatic virus. It is good news that strep throat can be generally treated by using antibiotics.

 

Diagnosis

Key diagnostic points

Your doctor will inquire regarding your health history, and then give an examination which includes the heart’s activity using the instrument called a stethoscope. Mitral valve stenosis results in an irregular heartbeats, also known as heartbeat.

Your doctor may be able to listen to your lungs for pulmonary congestion. This is the build-up of fluid inside the lungs. This could be caused by Mitral Valve Stenosis.

Your doctor will determine which tests are required to identify you and whether you’ll need to see an cardiologist.

Tests

An examination may be conducted to determine the root of mitral valve stenosis as well as to find out if the valve could be fixed. Common tests to detect mitral valve stenosis are:

Treatment

If you suffer from moderate or moderate valve narrowing that has no signs, you might not require treatment immediately. Instead, your physician will examine the valve to determine whether the condition is becoming worse.

Medications

There’s no prescribed drug that can end your emotions from flowing although their effects could be slowed down. Certain drugs may alleviate symptoms by reducing heart rate and regulating the heart rate.

Your doctor could suggest one or more these medicines:

Other procedures or surgeries

There may be a need for an adjustment to your valve or replacement in order to cure mitral valve narrowing which could involve surgical and non-surgical alternatives.

Mitral valve balloon valvuloplasty

 

Lifestyle and home remedies for home

Changing your lifestyle can help improve your heart health. If you suffer from mitral valve stenosis, your physician might recommend:

Women who suffer from mitral valve stenosis should discuss family planning with their physicians before they become pregnant. The heart is triggered when pregnant and has to perform more efficiently. The extent to which a heart that has mitral valve stenosis can handle the additional work is contingent on the severity of the stenosis as well as how the heart pumping. If you’re pregnant and suffer from mitral valve stenosis doctor should monitor you carefully.

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