Zingo

Generic name: lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate
Drug class: Topical anesthetics

Medically reviewed by  A Ras MD.

What is Zingo?

Zingo is a prescription medicine that is used to numb an area before a procedure.

Description

ZINGO ® (lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate) powder intradermal injection system contains 0.5 mg of sterile lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate.

The chemical name is 2-diethylamino-2′,6′-acetoxylidide, monohydrochloride, monohydrate. The molecular formula is C 14222O · HCl · H 2O with a molecular weight of 288.8 Da. Lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate, a local anesthetic of the amide class, has the following structural formula:

 

 

structure formula

 

 

Lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate is freely soluble in water, soluble in alcohol and chloroform, insoluble in ether, and melts at around 74–79°C.

ZINGO is a ready-to-use, sterile, single-use, disposable, needle-free delivery system. ZINGO consists of the following components: a drug reservoir cassette filled with 0.5 mg lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate as a powder with a nominal particle size of 40 µm, a pressurized helium gas cylinder, and a safety interlock. The safety interlock prevents inadvertent actuation of the device. Once ZINGO is pressed against the skin, the interlock is released, allowing the button to be depressed to actuate the device. A sound similar to that of a popping balloon is emitted at the time ZINGO is actuated.

Mechanism of Action

ZINGO delivers lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate into the dermis. Lidocaine is an amide-type local anesthetic agent that blocks sodium ion channels required for the initiation and conduction of neuronal impulses, resulting in local anesthesia.

Before taking Zingo, tell your doctor:

  • If you are allergic to Zingo; any part of this medicine; or any other drugs, foods, or substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had.

This is not a list of all drugs or health problems that interact with this medicine.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all of your drugs (prescription or OTC, natural products, vitamins) and health problems. You must check to make sure that it is safe for you to take Zingo with all of your drugs and health problems. Do not start, stop, or change the dose of any drug without checking with your doctor.

What are some things I need to know or do while I take Zingo?

  • Tell all of your health care providers that you take Zingo. This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists.
  • A severe blood problem called methemoglobinemia has happened with drugs like this one. The risk may be raised in people who have glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency, heart problems, or lung problems. The risk may also be raised while taking certain other drugs and in infants younger than 6 months of age. Tell your doctor if you have ever had methemoglobinemia.
  • You may hear a sound like a popping balloon when Zingo is used. This is normal.
  • If you are 65 or older, use Zingo with care. You could have more side effects.
  • Use with care in children. Talk with the doctor.
  • Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan on getting pregnant, or are breast-feeding. You will need to talk about the benefits and risks to you and the baby.

How is Zingo best taken?

Use Zingo as ordered by your doctor. Read all information given to you. Follow all instructions closely.

  • Your doctor will give Zingo.
  • It is given as a shot into the skin.

What do I do if I miss a dose?

  • Call your doctor to find out what to do.

What are the side effects of Zingo that I need to call my doctor about immediately?

WARNING/CAUTION: Even though it may be rare, some people may have very bad and sometimes deadly side effects when taking a drug. Tell your doctor or get medical help right away if you have any of the following signs or symptoms that may be related to a very bad side effect:

  • Signs of an allergic reaction, like rash; hives; itching; red, swollen, blistered, or peeling skin with or without fever; wheezing; tightness in the chest or throat; trouble breathing, swallowing, or talking; unusual hoarseness; or swelling of the mouth, face, lips, tongue, or throat.
  • Signs of methemoglobinemia like a blue or gray color of the lips, nails, or skin; a heartbeat that does not feel normal; seizures; very bad dizziness or passing out; very bad headache; feeling very sleepy; feeling tired or weak; or shortness of breath. This effect is rare but may be deadly if it happens.
  • Burning.
  • Bruising.
  • Bleeding where the shot is given.

What are some other side effects of Zingo?

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Pinpoint red spots on the skin.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088. You may also report side effects at https://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

If overdose is suspected:

If you think there has been an overdose, call your poison control center or get medical care right away. Be ready to tell or show what was taken, how much, and when it happened.

How do I store and/or throw out Zingo?

  • If you need to store Zingo at home, talk with your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist about how to store it.

 

Label

  • NDC 70645-123-12
    ZINGO®
    (lidocaine hydrochloride monohydrate)
    powder intradermal injection system 0.5 mg
    contains 12 sterile units
    Rx Only

ZINGO

SRC: NLM .